Aeroflot Mil V-12

Russian Aeroflot Mil V-12

An odd and Rare old bird for sure!

Aeroflot Mil V-12 (Mi-12) at Groningen Airport. This very rare and unusual bird was nicknamed “Homer” by the NATO and is by far one of the most exotic aircraft ever to have passed through the airport. It was accompanied by Mil Mi-8 CCCP-11097, both aircraft on their way to the Le Bourget airshow. Because they were not allowed to fly over West Germany (Cold War issues), they had to re-route via Denmark and also The Netherlands to take on fuel. Currently, this airframe is preserved at the Air Force museum in Monino, Russia.

By far largest helicopter ever built, this was unusual extrapolation of Mi-6 a decade later to match greater fixed-wing airlift of An-22 and Il-76. To avoid immense task of developing new set of rotors, reduction gears and transmission, decision taken to double up Mi-6 dynamics and use two sets of Mi-6 engines, gearboxes and lifting rotors side-by-side, left rotor being mirror image, with small overlap. Rotor rpm reduced to 112; gearboxes linked by transverse shafting. Axes inclined forward 4°30’. Engine/rotor groups carried on wings of light-alloy stressed-skin construction with 8° dihedral, sharp inverse taper and set at incidence 7° root 14° tip. Braced at root and tip to main landing gears with torque reacted by horizontal bracing to rear fuselage. Inner/outer trailing-edge flaps fixed in up position after flight trials. Fuel in outer wings and two external tanks; optional ferry tanks in cabin. Fixed twin-wheel landing gear with main tyres 1750 x 730mm, pneumatic brakes, and steerable nose tyres 1200 x 450mm. Large stressed-skin fuselage with crew door each side, three sliding side doors and full-section rear clamshell doors and ramp with left/right twin-wheel ventral bumpers. Aeroplane tail with fin, tabbed rudder, dihedralled tailplane with tabbed elevators, and endplate fins mounted vertically but toed inwards. Flight deck for pilot (left) with engineer behind and co-pilot (right) with elec-syst operator behind. Upper flight deck for nav with radio operator behind. Hydraulic flight control with emergency manual reversion. Autopilot with three-axis autostab; mapping radar under nose. AI-8 turbine APU for ground power and engine start. Main cabin 28.15m long, 4.4m square. Overhead gantry crane with four 1t hoists. Tip-up seats along sides (50 to 120).

First hover 1967 terminated by impact with ground causing severe damage; cause coincidence of primary airframe aeroelastic freq with natural freq of control system, causing uncontrollable vertical oscillations. Second (21142, now at Monino) flown by V.P.Koloshchyenko Aug 1969 to 2255m with payload of 40,204.5kg. NII tests completed and demos at Paris, but abandoned because Mi-26 far superior. ASCC name ‘Homer’.

By far largest helicopter ever built, this was unusual extrapolation of Mi-6 a decade later to match greater fixed-wing airlift of An-22 and Il-76. To avoid immense task of developing new set of rotors, reduction gears and transmission, decision taken to double up Mi-6 dynamics and use two sets of Mi-6 engines, gearboxes and lifting rotors side-by-side, left rotor being mirror image, with small overlap. Rotor rpm reduced to 112; gearboxes linked by transverse shafting. Axes inclined forward 4°30’. Engine/rotor groups carried on wings of light-alloy stressed-skin construction with 8° dihedral, sharp inverse taper and set at incidence 7° root 14° tip. Braced at root and tip to main landing gears with torque reacted by horizontal bracing to rear fuselage. Inner/outer trailing-edge flaps fixed in up position after flight trials. Fuel in outer wings and two external tanks; optional ferry tanks in cabin. Fixed twin-wheel landing gear with main tyres 1750 x 730mm, pneumatic brakes, and steerable nose tyres 1200 x 450mm. Large stressed-skin fuselage with crew door each side, three sliding side doors and full-section rear clamshell doors and ramp with left/right twin-wheel ventral bumpers. Aeroplane tail with fin, tabbed rudder, dihedralled tailplane with tabbed elevators, and endplate fins mounted vertically but toed inwards. Flight deck for pilot (left) with engineer behind and co-pilot (right) with elec-syst operator behind. Upper flight deck for nav with radio operator behind. Hydraulic flight control with emergency manual reversion. Autopilot with three-axis autostab; mapping radar under nose. AI-8 turbine APU for ground power and engine start. Main cabin 28.15m long, 4.4m square. Overhead gantry crane with four 1t hoists. Tip-up seats along sides (50 to 120).

First hover 1967 terminated by impact with ground causing severe damage; cause coincidence of primary airframe aeroelastic freq with natural freq of control system, causing uncontrollable vertical oscillations. Second (21142, now at Monino) flown by V.P.Koloshchyenko Aug 1969 to 2255m with payload of 40,204.5kg. NII tests completed and demos at Paris, but abandoned because Mi-26 far superior. ASCC name ‘Homer’.

 More information can be found here, just click on the link below:

http://sites.google.com/site/stingrayslistofrotorcraft/mil-v-12

3 Responses to Aeroflot Mil V-12

  1. Quite an amazing machine, this Aeroflot Mil V-12. It is a rare and odd old bird.

  2. Marel says:

    Didn’t know the forum rules allowed such bilralint posts.

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