Dive-bombing bridges over the Kwai river

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kwaicompoimage1Above: U.S. Army Air Forces Consolidated B-24 Liberator of the 7th Bomb Group attacking a bridge of the Moulmein-Ye rail line some 56 km (35 mi) south of Moulmein on 27 January 1945 (National Archives ARC Identifier 292589), and Gus Potthoff’s painting of a B-24 dive-bombing the “Kwai” bridges.

A polished Consolidated B-24J Liberator sits inside a Fantasy of Flight hangar in central Florida. The venerable bomber served in the skies of the China-India-Burma theater during World War II. One of the Liberators that flew in the region had Carl Fritsche, an Ohioan, at the controls. Far below, Gustav Potthoff witnessed Carl’s attacks on the bridges from the perspective of the ground. These men know the true story of the building and bombings of the Burma-Thailand Railway (Burma-Siam Railway) bridges. Their first-hand accounts differ considerably from that of the largely inaccurate 1957 Academy Award-winning film The Bridge on the River Kwai.

Carl Fritsche arrived in India via stops in Cairo and “Palestine.” He began flying with the 10th Air Force’s 7th Bombardment Group. Carl piloted a B-24 he named “The Crusader.” The name and painting applied to the airplane came from an image inside Jerusalem’s All Nations Church. In addition to attacking shipping and dropping supplies to frontline units, Carl and his squadron mates regularly attacked the Burma-Thailand Railway (Burma-Siam Railway). They also “dive-bombed” the bridges over the Mae Klong (commonly referred to as “Kwai”) River.

During the early months of World War II, the Japanese Imperial Army captured Dutch and British colonies. The ensnared populations essentially became mistreated and malnourished slaves. They consisted of Dutch Commonwealth, Dutch, British, British Commonwealth, Indian, Americans and others. Whether ill, injured or healthy, thousands involuntarily went to work on construction projects.

One major Japanese undertaking was the building of the Burma-Siam Railway to supply their troops in Burma. Two groups, one based in Siam and the other in Burma, worked from opposite ends. The result was a railway and 2 particularly notable bridges over the Mae Klong River. The first trestle was a temporary wooden bridge. The second was a steel and concrete structure.

During the railway’s construction some 13,000 prisoners died. Approximately 80,000 to 100,000 civilians from Malaya and the Dutch East Indies, as well as conscripts from Siam (Thailand) and Burma, also expired in the course of the construction. Understandably, the railway’s unofficial name became the “Death Railroad.”

One of the laboring prisoners of war was Gustav Potthoff. Mr. Potthoff was born in the Netherlands East Indies. (The country is now Indonesia.) In 1941, he enlisted in a Royal Netherlands East Indies Army tank battalion at Bandoeng, Java. Mr. Potthoff saw many people die and personally experienced the brutality of his Japanese captors and Korean guards. Gus credits the Lord, his “Higher Power,” angels and spirits for enabling him to survive the horrendous ordeal.

According to Gus, in 1942 the wooden bridge first came under aerial attack, and afterward Gus and his oppressed colleagues had to build an additional trestle. It too became a target of American B-24 Liberators, and the center span suffered damage. The wooden structure no longer exists, but most of the other remains and is in use.

In a video, Mr. Fritsche explains that the bomber pilots would employ their B-24s as dive-bombers, an unusual and not recommended role for large and heavy aircraft. Carl and his fellow pilots, when attacking bridges, would often begin a dive at an altitude ranging from 1,800 to 1,500 feet. Each released their bomb loads (usually 4 500-pound bombs) from 100 to 50 feet. The “bomb sights” were a row of rivets along the top of the forward fuselage, and the aiming points were the abutments supporting the tracks.

Of the 688 bridges along the course of the railroad, the B-24 “drivers” could put 30-40 out of use per day. Carl indicates that if the merciless Japanese knew an attack was pending, they would march prisoners out onto the structures in an attempt to deter the Liberators from their tasks. However, the B-24s would bomb without hesitation. After the raids the enemy would repeatedly send prisoners to repair any damage.

In total, Captain Carl Fritsche accumulated 486 combat hours over the course of 59 missions. Carl’s interesting tale is on the DVD Carl Fritsche’s Story: From the Holy Land to India to the Kwai River in a B-24 Liberator. Christ the King Church in Columbus, Ohio, was the setting for this lecture and recording. Contact Mr. Christopher Lefchik at (614) 476-4068 to purchase copies.

Gus’ story, Lest We Forget: A Survivor’s Story, is a product of WFYI and the Atturbury-Bakalar Air Museum. The museum sells this video. Those interested in buying a copy should telephone (812) 372-4356. The Atterbury-Bakalar Air Museum also maintains a Web page that relates some of Gus’ story.

Fantasy of Flight is in Polk City, Fla. The complex is north of Interstate 4 at 1400 Broadway Boulevard Southeast. Fantasy of Flight’s telephone number is (863) 984-3500.

4 Responses to Dive-bombing bridges over the Kwai river

  1. Bill Walker says:

    I saw the movie the bridge over the Kwai several times and I loved it. Thanks for the facts

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    Awesome blog, i saw the movie too

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